Transformed emotional wellbeing and mental health service for Surrey’s children and young people gets underway

8 April 2021

A new alliance of NHS, national and local voluntary sector organisations has come together to deliver a transformed emotional wellbeing and mental health service for Surrey’s children, young people and families. It will provide a new and broader range of services for children and families and adopt the THRIVE Framework developed by the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and the Anna Freud National Centre For Children and Families.

Implementing the THRIVE Framework means children, young people and families will have a central voice in decisions about their care, and goals identified by them will drive what they choose to help achieve them. This might be through Getting Advice and Signposting, Getting Help, Getting More Help or sometimes Getting Risk Support. There will be a greater emphasis on providing support earlier, and more opportunity to access a range of services in many different ways and settings.

The new range of services will be rolled out in two phases: phase one (April to September 2021), and phase two (October 2021 to April 2022). This will help ensure that families will be safe and well supported while changes are introduced, and feedback will be reviewed and incorporated along the way to ensure the new services are as effective as possible. In the short term, any support and treatment plans in place will continue and, for now, access to services will continue to be via the usual contact details.

Personalised Programmes for Children family image

A significant increase in funding will help improve and increase services. There will be a substantial number of changes and improvements over the next two years, with the following changes to be seen very soon:

  • Considerably increased staff resource – more than 100 new staff over the next year or two combined with a two-year programme of training to be delivered by the Tavistock and Portman Clinical Programme Team alongside the National i-THRIVE Programme.
  • Transformed neurodevelopmental services which will, for the first time, introduce treatment offers
  • 24/7 Crisis line for children, young people and families
  • Out-of-hours advice for families struggling with extremely challenging behaviour
  • Widened assertive outreach for vulnerable children
  • Introduction of a wellbeing passport
  • Far easier self-referral
  • New activity-based wellbeing campaigns
Overall, there will be a greater focus on providing support when emotional wellbeing or mental health needs begin to emerge. Professionals in schools, primary care and the community will receive increased support and training to be able to help earlier and prevent a deterioration in emotional wellbeing and mental health.

 A young person, aged 17, who currently accesses emotional wellbeing and mental health support in Surrey said: “I like the fact that there are lots of options that are now easy to find out about, before I felt it was hard to know where to go or who to ask for support.”

 Dr Tosin Bowen-Wright, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Programme Lead for the Tavistock and Portman Surrey Clinical Programme Team, said “This is an exciting time for services providing support to children, young people and families in the county of Surrey. We are thrilled to be part of this Alliance Partnership to support the implementation of the THRIVE Framework for system change, a process which will bring the voices of children, young people and their parents or carers to the heart of decision making about service provision across the county”

 The new provision has been developed in partnership with children, young people and professionals and will see services transformed across Surrey. It puts the wants and needs of the child or young person first and provides a greater choice of support available both for the young person and for families.

ENDS


Notes to Editors:

1.    The THRIVE Framework for system change (Wolpert et al., 2019) is an integrated, person-centred and needs led approach to delivering mental health services for children, young people and their families that was developed by a collaboration of authors from the Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families.

2.    The new services will be delivered through a larger workforce, with more than 100 new staff over the next year or two. These staff will increase capacity, some to take up new innovative roles and others to support new services.

3.    A new Community Wellbeing Team has been created whose focus is on supporting young people in the community as soon as they start to feel they are struggling. Over the coming year, other new roles will be introduced to work in and with schools, and within the community to provide early support. Over the next three years Mental Health Support Teams (who will work with clusters of schools providing a range of services including guided self-help, CBT and counselling) will increase significantly from three to 13. 

4.    Other planned changes include a transformed neurodevelopmental service which will follow on from a co-design process with schools and will, for the first time, introduce treatment offers into the neurodevelopment service. Other changes include widened assertive outreach for vulnerable children; a 24/7 crisis line for children, young people and families; an out-of-hours advice line for families struggling with extremely challenging behaviour; and far easier self-referral. Also coming soon will be new activity-based wellbeing campaigns and the introduction of a wellbeing passport that details the young person’s mental health history, so they don’t need to repeat their story each time they talk to a professional.

5.   Later this year a neurodevelopmental hub will be launched which will act as a central point for specialist clinicians across the region working with children and young people with multiple or complex needs such as autism. This hub (which will be both virtual and physical) will provide more intensive support and facilitate multi-agency working and risk management, along with consultation and advice to community and school-based workers.

6.    The alliance comprises Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, who will act as lead provider with a focus on delivery of clinical interventions and crisis support. Barnardo’s, who will provide engagement and participation with children and young people and will also focus on neurodevelopmental support and staff training. Learning Space and The National Autistic Society, who will focus on delivery of the new service with an emphasis on the neurodevelopmental pathway providing support to children, young people and families.

7.    The Surrey Wellbeing Partnership (SWP) is a group of voluntary organisations comprising Barnardo’s, The East to West Trust, The Eikon Charity, Emerge, Learning Space, Leatherhead Youth Project, The Matrix Trust, The National Autistic Society, Peer Productions, Relate West Surrey, Step by Step Partnership Ltd, Surrey Care Trust and YMCA East Surrey. The SWP will play a key role in early support, building relationships with children, young people and families and strengthening links with the wider community provision.

8.    The Tavistock and Portman will develop the Surrey THRIVE Framework and training programme in collaboration with the National i-THRIVE Programme Team to help strengthen clinical leadership and support an outcomes-based framework.

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